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Friday, May 16, 2008

Lining Your Soap Molds With Silicone Caulk

I have been struggling with the soap mold lining dilemma.  I have tried the garbage bag.  That leaves deep creases in the soap loaf. Waste of soap, because you either have to cut of the creases or have it be ugly.  

I have tried doing this wax paper cutting/fitting thing, and I am spatially and measuring-ly inept.  I even used BitterCreek's candlesupply.com instruction sheet on how to line a wooden soap mold.   There is a lot of measuring, cutting, creasing, taping and doing it right in that tutorial.  This is a great LOOKING tutorial and if you are a crafty attention-to-detail with your fingers person, great.  Go check it out. I am not someone who can master that with the time I have and frustration levels I climb to.  Soap making is supposed to be fun for me, not a lining challenge.  The last thing I want to do is spend more time trying to line a mold than making the soap.  


It comes out perfect, and when I do it, it looks like a hyper Jack Russell Terrier got spooked in a paper factory.  You know exactly what I mean because you have probably been there yourself.  

Yeah.

But while reading Smelly Chicks, I found an easier and permanent way to line your wooden molds. I am going to try doing this this weekend.  Marr found the original tutorial on the Soap Dish Forum.  You have to be a member to access it - I just signed up as The Soap Bar so maybe I'll see you over there.


Lining your mold with silicone caulk.
If anyone has other ways of lining a mold easily, please share and if you'd like to write a tutorial on your lining talent, I'd be happy to post it.

17 comments:

Suds to Love said...

I have been struggling with this problem also, but I have two solutions that have been working for me in the last few batches. Head over to the craft store and pick up some Fun Foam (get as light as possible colors, or white if possible, I didn't). Cut it to fit your molds, and if you have two or more of the same size mold, label your mold with which liner goes in there (this is where the colors come in handy). Or, they sell very thin flexible cutting boards, which I am trying as well, in one of my slab molds. Hope this information helps, let me know if you have any questions!
Trisha

egassner said...

I have yet to make my first batch, but my hubby's cousin uses a silicone loaf pan (the kind you find in the kitchen isle at Wal-Mart) and then put the silicone pan inside a regular metal/glass loaf pan so that it holds its shape. I thought that was a pretty easy and inexpensive way to go

Burnt Mill Candles & Soap said...

I was never able to get the BC one to work for me, way too hard.

so I had went in search of another way to line it. I found this one and it works the best for me

http://www.chestnutfarms.com/Soap_and_supplies/line_mold/

basically it is like wrapping a present. you build a box to go inside your box.

Marr Williams said...

Thanks for the shout out Joanna! I have tried the funky foam and of course freezer paper. I loved funky foam until I used the silicone caulk. I prefer not to line at all. The first couple of batches I didn't really trust that it would come out and added a wide strip of freezer paper to help pull it out - but I don't need it. It may depend on the recipe used as well. From what I understand - you have to give the molds a refresher coat every so often to keep up with any wear and tear.

Heidi said...

Joanna, don't you know how hard it is to laugh after a c-section = ) I may have to swear off your blogs for another week ;-P

Thank you for posting this!!!! I HATE lining molds too...and its always the one thing I forget and leave until the last minute.

Does it only work for box molds that don't come apart, or can I do this even though my mold breaks down?

Candice said...

This is the part of the soap making process that I honestly hate, it frustrates me to no end fiddling with and cutting the wax paper to the perfect dimensions and then trying to get it taped and fitted into the mold. I will have to check out this other option, it looks interesting!

Joanna Schmidt said...

If anyone tries it, please send me pictures: jo@productbody(dot)com

Shannons Irish Bliss said...

I am also challenged when it comes to cutting out the paper to fit the mold... At the moment I grease up my wood mold with a liquid veg oil then I line it with plastic wrap (Saran wrap). The oil underneath cuts out the static and the wrap sticks to the wood without having to tape it down. My soap slides out of the mold with no trouble at all and I just have wringles bits on the ends to cut off. This is still a bit of work so I am thinking I will try silicone...

Kim said...

I use wax paper. I fold until it's the proper width, place it in, then take the mold cover and mush it down so that it's creased in. When I put my soap in (I am a hot process soapmaker, remember), I spoon it in and then bang the mold several times until I know the soap is snug and there is no air. I also scare the heck out of my cats. I repeat the spooning and banging until the mold is filled.

When the soap sets, it's easy to remove because I leave a good amount of paper slack and it's double/triple layered, so it's more durable than a thin layer of wax paper. It usually slides out pretty nicely.

I then cut my soap into bars and ley them breathe for about 8-10 hours. After this, I use a potato peeler to trim off the sides.

gracefruit said...

If you hate lining molds, here are two links you might find helpful:

http://www.silvermoonsoapsupply.com/

And

http://www.uplandsoapfactory.com

I have not used the first company, but I've read heaps of good press about them. I do own two Upland molds and I love them with all of my heart. They are great for anyone with mold-lining phobia.

Michelle said...

Joanna, your blog is so fun to read! I cannot count how many challenges I've had with the soap mold. OMG! There are the plastic wrap stories... the freezer paper stories... the list goes on. If people could only see me in the soap kitchen trying to work with the mold.

Heather@Twin Birch said...

Spot on, Joanna! Lining molds is lousy! I just bought a tray mold from BB and I'm in head-over-heels love with it!! Instead of using a garbage bag (too thick) they recommend a 1 mil plastic painter's drop cloth (paint aisle of your hardware store) It's perfect! cut, line, pop in plastic collar, done.

I'm the girl who lost at least 3 days of her life trying to cut freezer paper to fit my loaf molds.
Hideous. I'm seriously considering the caulking! That's smart!

Eat Well (was Teresa R) said...

I refuse to line my baking pans, so therefore, I absolutely refuse to line any other pans. ;) I'll be off to check out Gracefruit's suggested sites.

Michelle said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Michelle said...

Hey Joanna, I hope you don't mind me posting this question here. It came to mind and thought I'd ask:

Hi Joanna,

I was just wondering, do you think the chemicals of the caulk could leech into the soap? Polydimethylsiloxane is a chemical found in silicon caulk and upon heating up it breaks down and turns into formaldehyde. Methyltriacetoxysilane is also an ingredient and one of those chemicals that causes all kinds of health problems.

Call me paranoid LOL! But I guess I would shy away from using it :(

lyly said...

silicon lined mold...
ok so i tired it after reading your post.. the hard part is spreading it nice and evenly... it is so difficult to get it right..

i did make some soap and used it.. and didnt really seem to work maybe i didnt use enough to line it..
I had once again added another layer, a thick layer.. i have not tried it yet.. but when i do i will post the results..

lucky.. it was cheap little wood box that i use for slab mold.. like 1lbs worth for testing...
It was only 1 dollar so if i ruin it at least i didnt ruin the expensive ones :)

Angie said...

Hi Joanna!
I didn't try this yet but because of that link I discovered the idea of using the Ikea 9 drawer chest as a mold. It's great! I put it together and used it for the first time last night. It has so many drawers that I'm going to cut slits in one to use as a cutter box so my bars are nice and even. And silly me was going to spend $20 on one mold when now I have 8 molds and a cutter box for only $15! Thanks for posting this!